Grocery list

A couple of months ago I stumbled on this interesting link that portrays grocery lists of 20 families around the world. While one could certainly argue the representativeness of pictures, I still believe that some rough estimates can be made from them. This inspired me to take my own “grocery list” picture, but realization is somewhat different from the original one. Firstly, it would be difficult for me to buy a whole week food supplies in one go and I buy a lot of items for longer periods (i.e. nuts, as they are cheaper in bulk quantities). I also buy some supplies in larger quantities, such as meat, and store them in freezer, so that all messy packing is done once a month. And finally, my apartment is small, so even if I gathered all items I could place them to fit in one picture. So the obvious solution is to take more pictures!

Vegetables and fruits

Vegetables

Vegetables

I buy most of my vegetables and fruits in local grocery store and recently more often in nearby farmers market. I try to buy local produce but I do not buy organic. In season, I also get quite a lot of vegetables from acquaintances living in Ljubljana suburbs.

Meats

Minced beef meat, beef liver, smoked pork neck, turkey fillet

Minced beef meat, beef liver, smoked pork neck, turkey fillet

I buy meat at butcher, with all meat from local stock farmer. As with vegetables, I also get quite a lot of meat (especially beef liver!) from small local farmers in Ljubljana suburbs.

Milk and dairy products, eggs

Dairy products (cottage cheese, sweet and sour cream, butter) and eggs

Dairy products (cottage cheese, sweet and sour cream, butter) and eggs

Luckily, we have a “milk-o-mat” just under our apartment building. Every morning, a farmer from Ljubljana suburbs delivers freshly milked (raw and full fat) milk, which you can then pour into your own containers. I use glass bottles, and the milk lasts 3 days in the refrigerator. Lately, I also get most of my cottage cheese, cream and sour cream from small local farmers. Taste of local milk and dairy products is really worth extra effort for obtaining them. And to keep me busy, I also experiment and quite frequently make my own cottage cheese, but more about that in some later blog post.

As far as the eggs goes, I try to buy them from local farmers as well, as you can really taste the difference from the battery cage farms eggs.

Nuts and seeds

Brazil nuts, Hazelnuts, Almonds, Walnuts and Macadamia nuts

Brazil nuts, Hazelnuts, Almonds, Walnuts and Macadamia nuts

I buy nuts in large quantities (kilograms!) in market places or in local grocery store. I keep them in glass container, as (I learned that) moths can easily infiltrate into plastic bags!

Fishes

Tuna, salmon and sardine cans, hake, salmon and tuna fillet

Tuna, salmon and sardine cans, hake, salmon and tuna fillet

I buy sardines, tuna and salmon in cans or tuna and salmon in fish market. I use cans for salad snacks at workplace or at home, while fish steaks are usually for lunch. When buying cans, I only buy if fishes in olive oil or in plain water. Absolutely no vegetable oils!

Weekly Totals

Based on my nutrient intake counting, as described in one of my earlier posts, my average weekly totals for 2013 add up to:

  • Milk – 2,97 l,
  • Dairy products – 4,79 kg,
  • Meat – 1,99 kg,
  • Fish – 0,91 kg,
  • Fruits – 1,91 kg,
  • Vegetables – 6,09 kg,
  • Eggs – 0,87 kg (approx 14 pcs),
  • Nuts & seeds – 0,64 kg.

These weekly totals represent quantities only for me. Frequently, I also have to feed another endurance athlete 😉 She eats mostly the same meals as me, so the weekly totals for my household are quite larger. Occasionally I do have to feed my daughter Ajda as well, but it seems that the later doesn’t eat much of what I cook 😉 So I would deem her effect on weekly totals as negligible…

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